Sublime & A Lesson in Life

 The Definition of Sublime

Descriptive of the Master Mason Degree since 1754 when the word first appears in the Certificate of the Grand Lodge of Ireland, (Latin, limen, the upper part of the door-the lintel. Latin sub is under or up to; hence sublime, raised aloft to a higher state. In common use , sublime denotes that which is majestic, greater, and more important than beautiful.

A Rose, a Baby’s smile, a woman may all be beautiful, but it is a dramatic sunset, which is sublime. Pretty and delightful apply to a Chopin waltz, but sublime is reserved for the music of such Masters as Beethoven and Bach.

The Sublime Degree of a Master Mason refers to the majestic conception of immortality thereon presented.

A Lesson in Life        

There was a man who had four sons, He wanted his sons to learn not to judge things too quickly. So he sent them on a quest, in turn to go and look at a pear tree that was a great distance away.

The first son went in Winter, the second in Spring, the third in Summer & the youngest in the Fall.

When they had all gone and come back, he called them together to describe what they had seen.

The first son, said that the tree was ugly, bent and twisted, the second son said NO it was covered with green buds and full of promise, the Third son disagreed, he said it was laden with blossoms that smelled so sweet and looked so beautiful. It was the most graceful thing he had ever seen. The last son disagreed with all of them. He said it was ripe and drooping with fruit, full of life and fulfillment.

The man explained to his sons that they were all right, because each of them had seen only one season of the tree’s life. He told them that you cannot judge a tree, or a person, by only one season, and that the essence of who they are and the pleasure, joy, and love that come from that life can only be measured at the end, when all the seasons are over.

If you give up when it’s Winter, you will miss the promise of Spring, the beauty of your Summer and the fulfillment of your Fall.

The Moral of this Story is.

Don’t let the pain of one Season destroy the joy of all the rest.

Don’t judge life by one difficult Season

Persevere through difficult patches and remember better times are sure to come soon.!!!!

Children’s Letters to God.

Dear God. Is it true that my father won’t get into Heaven, if he uses his GOLF words in the house?

Dear God. How did you know you were God?      Who told you?

Dear God. In Bible times, did they really talk that fancy?            Jennifer

Dear God,

I didn’t think orange went with purple until I saw the Sunset you made on Tuesday Night.            That was real cool     Thomas.

Dear God. I’m doing the best I can             REALLY       signed NORM

With that thought in mind, I will close off and wish you and yours God’s Blessing.

 

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About Norm McEvoy